North Carolina State Health Plan Options

To help all of the State employees of North Carolina figure out which version of the State Health Plan would be best for them during the upcoming year, I thought we would attempt to review the differences between the three options – CDHP (85/15), Enhanced 80/20, and Traditional 70/30. The State has developed a very informative site with lots of details and specifics for the State Health Plan, so I won’t repeat anything you can find there. The goal of this post is to compare, line by line, what the numbers associated with each plan mean and which types of medical situations end up being the preferred option financially for each person once all expenses have been considered.

All State Employees should have received a “Decision Guide for Open Enrollment” packet from their insurer for the 2017 benefit period sometime in the past few weeks. You can use the “2017 State Health Plan Comparison” table on Page 8 in this booklet, or you can click on this link to get the PDF online. Here we go!

2017 North Carolina State Health Plan Comparison

HRA Starting Balance: You’ll notice that the CDHP plan is the only option with an Health Reimbursement Account (HRA). An HRA is basically a fund that your employer sets aside to pay for your qualifying medical expenses. With the CDHP plan, an individual has their first $600 in health expenses paid through their employer’s HRA. This is basically free money, as long as you need it and use it for things that are approved by your plan (eg. doctor’s visits, most prescriptions). Effectively, this splits the CDHP’s $1,500 deductible into two different periods, where you end up only having to pay once you hit $601 in expenses each year.

One thing to consider is that you actually need to use $600 in health expenses for this aspect of the plan to help. If you don’t use it, the $600 set aside for you in your employer’s account usually resets and lets the employer keep any unused funds to help reduce expenses the following year. While $600 is the same to anyone, this is an especially nice feature for people who expect their total health expenses to be less than $600 per year because they’ll never have to pay anything except their premiums.

Annual Deductible:deductible is the amount of money you will have to pay out-of-pocket for non-preventive services before the actual benefits on your insurance plan will start to take effect. Of the three options available, the 70/30 has the lowest deductible, but that doesn’t mean it is the best plan. This means that the plan’s benefits kick in earlier, but the 70/30 plan also has greater expenses after the deductible and a much higher out-of-pocket maximum than the other plans. Other than just the dollar amount, there are two distinct differences in how these deductibles are applied:

  • The CDHP plan applies all medical expenses to the deductible. Your sick visits, specialist appointments, prescriptions – everything goes towards your initial $1,500 deductible. Other than the covered ACA Preventive Services, this plan doesn’t pay any of your health care expenses until after you have met the deductible.
  • The 80/20 and 70/30 plan have co-payments for PCP visits, urgent cares, and prescriptions so the deductible only applies to things like surgeries, labs, and hospital visits. While the deductibles are lower, they are also less likely to be met because they only apply to certain things.

Co-Insurance: You might notice that the co-insurance rate is also indicative of the name of the plan – eg. the 80/20 plan features a 20% co-insurance. The co-insurance is a percentage that requires the patient to pay a certain portion of approved medical services once their deductibles have been met. Basically, as a reward for paying 100% of everything out-of-pocket before you met the deductible, your insurance will now start helping pay your health expenses by reducing your portion to either 15%, 20%, or 30%, depending on the plan. Once you have met your deductible, this is the percentage of your health expenses you will be required to pay until you have met your co-insurance maximum.

Medical Co-Insurance Maximum: The 70/30 plan is the only one that has a medical co-insurance maximum. The other plans have their own maximums, so while this seems like a small bit of semantics, but it actually makes a pretty big difference in your possible expenses. The CDHP only has a combined out-of-pocket maximum that includes co-insurance and pharmacy benefits, while the 80/20 plan skips the co-insurance maximum and separates the out-of-pocket maximums between medical and pharmacy. By calling it a “co-insurance maximum” and not a “out-of-pocket maximum,” this number does not include the annual deductible that has already been paid.

This graphic does not include the separate prescription deductibles associated with the 80/20 and 70/30 plans.

Because the $4,350 out-of-pocket maximum in the 80/20 plan includes the $1,250 deductible, the 80/20 plan’s effective “co-insurance maximum” is really only $3,100. With the 70/30 plan, you’ll be paying the $1,080 deductible PLUS $4,388 more. A small difference, but one that costs over $1,200 if it actually comes into play. Also, it is important to remember that the 80/20 and 70/30 plans have separate deductibles for prescriptions, which we will get into soon.

Medical Out-of Pocket Maximum: As mentioned in the previous paragraph, the medical out-of-pocket maximum includes all out-of-pocket expenses a person would have to pay for medical services each year. This includes co-payments, co-insurances, and deductibles. For the 80/20 plan, this means you’ll have a cap on your medical expenses each year of $4,350. Because this number includes the deductible, you’ll basically be paying a $1,250 deductible, and then +20% of the next $15,500 in health expenses you incur (for a total of $4,350). This number puts a cap on your total annual medical expenses, so you can consider this the limit of a “worst case” scenario (not including prescription coverage).

Pharmacy Out-of Pocket Maximum: This is just like the medical out-of-pocket maximum described above, but only for prescriptions. The 80/20 plan and 70/30 plan both have separate deductibles for prescriptions, while the CDHP plan assigns both medical and pharmacy claims towards the same deductible. This makes it seem like the CDHP plan has better prescription coverage than the 80/20 or 70/30 plan, but those two only apply their deductibles to high tiered prescriptions that aren’t used by very many people. With the 80/20 and 70/30 plans, most of your prescriptions will be a set price for a 30- or 90-day supply, so most people will never really get close to meeting their limits with simple $5 and $30 co-payments per month.

Out-of-Pocket Maximum (Combined Medical and Pharmacy): The basic concept was covered in the previous two sections, but this number represents the “worst case scenario” for all of your out-of-pocket health expenses combined. There is no scenario where an individual will have to pay more than $3,500 on the CDHP plan, $6,850 on the 80/20 plan, or $8,828 on the 70/30 plan. This is a helpful number to know if you’re going to need a major surgery or hospitalization. These numbers are relatively low compared to today’s health insurance environment, where standard maximums are usually around $10,000 or $15,000 annually, so this is a one of the best aspects of the State Health Plan and a major selling point for most people.

ACA Preventive Services: These are the rates for certain services that have been categorized as “preventive” by stipulations in the Affordable Care Act, which has been adopted by the State Health Plan. You can check out the details of what is considered a preventive service on the State’s website – this includes things like your annual wellness exam, most vaccinations, and standard age-based guidelines and screenings. Preventive medicine has been proven to keep people healthier, so insurer’s are making a big push to ensure all of their members get these basic, cost-effective primary care services now so they can avoid having to pay for complicated, expensive hospital visits later. Because the services are preventive, and not urgent, the insurance penalizes you significantly for receiving these services out-of-network, so make sure the provider you see accepts your insurance if you want to receive these benefits.

Office Visits: So far, everything has basically seemed most favorable to the CDHP 85/15 plan. The next few topics are where the real benefits of the 80/20 and 70/30 plans come in, since they have co-payments for most medical services, instead of a deductible. While their deductible may be higher, it also applies to fewer things that you are likely to need. This is also the part of your benefits that applies to appointments at Family Care, if you were wondering.

For example, consider a single primary care visit for the flu – to make it easy, we’ll say its your first visit of the year.

  • With the CDHP plan, you are paying 100% of the cost of the visit because you haven’t met your deductible yet. This includes the doctor’s visit, flu testing, lab work, prescriptions, and any other services you may need. However, if the visit falls within the first $600 of your annual health expenses, the charges would be paid by your HRA account and you would not owe anything out-of-pocket. You would also get $25 added to your HRA, so you can think of that like a cash-back rebate towards your health expenses for using an in-network provider. After your HRA has been exhausted for the year, you will owe 100% of every office visit you have for the next $900, and 15% after that until you reach your maximum.
  • With the 80/20 plan, you would only pay a $25 co-payment for a doctor’s office visit, rather than having the charges applied to your deductible and owing 100%. Basically, you would save about $75 every time you went to a PCP and $215 every time you went to a specialist. If you had any testing or additional services (eg. flu test, breathing treatment, etc.), your deductible would apply in addition to your co-payment. This makes things relatively simple and helps people budget costs once they expect to have several office visits each year.
  • The 70/30 plan has the highest co-payments, but they are still not too far off from the 80/20 plan and the deductible applies to PCP visits the same way. You will have a higher co-payment, but still pay the same rates for additional services towards your deductible.

Urgent Care: Just like the section on Office Visits, but in an Urgent Care setting. There isn’t too much different about the basic process from office visits, so the main thing to notice is how much higher your expenses will be at an urgent care vs. your primary care provider. Whenever possible, you should always try to visit your primary care provider before attempting to go to an urgent care. For example, at this great independent primary care facility known as Family Care, we can guarantee either same-day or next-day appointments, so we can help you avoid the higher costs and lower quality of service that you’re bound to experience at an urgent care facility.

The nice thing is that the benefits for urgent care visits are identical at both in-network and out-of-network providers. Because the problem you are experiencing is obviously “urgent” if you are visiting an urgent care, your insurance company won’t care about the network and allow you to get treated wherever is most convenient. They charge a steep fee for this convenience, but it is still nice to know you won’t be charged more because of the network.

Emergency Room: Again, the CDHP plan applies charges to a deductible, while the 80/20 and 70/30 plan have co-payments associated with the visits. Depending on the significance of your reason for visiting the ER and how close you are to meeting your deductible, either one might be considered the best option for your situation. The one, and probably only, benefit to an ER visit is that you’ll likely go well beyond your entire out-of-pocket in just a few hours, so your healthcare will basically be “free” for the rest of the year. Yay for you!

Inpatient Hospital: This is reserved for actual hospital stays where the patient is admitted and kept in the hospital for some period of time. With all of the plans, you’ll only end up receiving the benefits in this row if you visit the ER and are then later admitted to the hospital. The insurance does not try to charge you twice after an admission, so the bump from an ER visit to an admission is not too drastic. The CDHP and 80/20 plans have an option to either get money back or have their co-payments waived if you visit a Blue Options Designated Hospital, so you should try to visit a preferred hospital whenever possible.

Prescription Coverage: The concept of tiers is pretty complicated, so I will go over this part in a separate post. However, the basics are still pretty much as the regular medical benefits the same across the three options. The CDHP has prescriptions applied to the same deductible as everything else, while the 80/20 and 70/30 plans have co-payments associated with different tiers of drugs. If you aren’t sure what these terms really mean, here is a good 2.5 minute video on what a drug formulary is and why your insurance has grouped different drugs into tiers.

For the State Health Plan, specifically, here are the links to the specific formulary for each plan. You should look up the medications you take to determine what tier they are classified under so you can get a good idea of your expected costs for that drug. The formulary changes all the time and the difference between a Tier 1 drug and a Tier 2 drug could be hundreds of dollars per year, so this helps keep you from being surprised when you show up at the pharmacy.

Which plan should I choose?

In my opinion, the State Health Plan is the best health insurance to have in North Carolina. Each plan has their specific benefits and drawbacks, but they are all significantly better insurance plans than the plans you’re likely to find available on Healthcare.gov. The problem is finding the plan that makes the most sense for how it will actually be used by you and your family. Every medical situation is unique, but here are some of the pros and cons of each plan to might help you make your final decision.

CDHP (85/15)

  • Pros: Potential for $0 premium and includes the lowest cost to add children and/or spouse. If you spend under $600 per person, your out-of-pocket expenses will be paid entirely by your HRA. This plan has the lowest out-of-pocket maximum, so this plan has the best “worst case scenario.”
  • Cons: You are required to pay for 100% of your expenses between $600 and $1,500 each year. You’ll have to pay for prescriptions under the same deductible as medical expenses. You’ll need to take additional steps to set up your HRA with your employer.

Enhanced 80/20

  • Pros: Lowest co-payments for PCP and Urgent Care visits, as well as most prescriptions. Pharmacy deductible is only $2,500, so meeting that deductible could help reduce overall costs if prescriptions make up a large percentage of your medical expenses.
  • Cons: Requires at least $15 per month, minimum, in premiums and has the highest premium cost to add family members. Potentially has the highest cost in a situation where multiple family members need extensive care and prescription coverage.

Traditional 70/30

  • Pros: Has a lower premium than the 80/20, but still maintains a similar structure for PCP and urgent care visits. Has co-payments for Tier 3 medications, so certain medications might be cheaper than the other plans. One prescription deductible applies to the entire family.
  • Cons: Has the worst coverage after the deductible has been met of the three plans. Because the premium is similar to the CDHP, while the coverage is similar to the 80/20 plan, the segment of people that would have the best coverage for their unique situations is fairly narrow. Most people would be better off getting the CDHP or 80/20, but there is a definite middle group where this plan makes the most sense.

I hope this was a helpful breakdown of the major components of these three plans. For more details on how you should think about this information, in general, be sure to check out our recent post on the 3 things you should consider when signing up for health insurance.

If you have any questions, please submit them in the comments and I’ll be sure to reply. Thanks for reading!

Flu shots are now available!

Flu shots are now available at Family Care for the 2016 flu season! Help protect you and everyone you come in contact with for the next few months by getting vaccinated against influenza. Here are some frequently asked questions that have been answered by the CDC about the flu vaccine:

Why should people get vaccinated against the flu?

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. Over a period of 31 seasons between 1976 and 2007, estimates of flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people.

During recent flu seasons, between 80% and 90% of flu related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older. “Flu season” in the United States can begin as early as October and last as late as May. During this time, flu viruses are circulating at higher levels in the U.S. population. An annual seasonal flu vaccine (either the flu shot or the nasal spray flu vaccine) is the best way to reduce the chances that you will get seasonal flu and spread it to others. When more people get vaccinated against the flu, less flu can spread through that community.

How do flu vaccines work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Traditional flu vaccines (called “trivalent” vaccines) are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. There are also flu vaccines made to protect against four flu viruses (called “quadrivalent” vaccines). These vaccines protect against the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine and an additional B virus.

Who should get vaccinated this season?

Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season. This recommendation has been in place since February 24, 2010 when CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted for “universal” flu vaccination in the United States to expand protection against the flu to more people.

Vaccination to prevent influenza is particularly important for people who are at high risk of serious complications from influenza. See People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications for a full list of age and health factors that confer increased risk.

More information is available at Who Should Get Vaccinated Against Influenza.

Who Should Not Be Vaccinated?

CDC recommends use of the flu shot (inactivated influenza vaccine or IIV) and the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2016-2017. Different flu vaccines are approved for use in different groups of people. Factors that can determine a person’s suitability for vaccination, or vaccination with a particular vaccine, include a person’s age, health (current and past) and any allergies to flu vaccine or its components.

When should I get vaccinated?

Flu vaccination should begin soon after vaccine becomes available, if possible by October. However, as long as flu viruses are circulating, vaccination should continue to be offered throughout the flu season, even in January or later. While seasonal influenza outbreaks can happen as early as October, during most seasons influenza activity peaks in January or later. Since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against influenza virus infection, it is best that people get vaccinated so they are protected before influenza begins spreading in their community.

Flu vaccine is produced by private manufacturers, and the timing of availability depends on when production is completed. Shipments began in August and will continue throughout October and November until all vaccine is distributed.

Are you up to date on your vaccines?

This is our nurse Melissa’s first blog post! Yay!

August is an exciting month here at Family Care because August is National Immunization Awareness month! This includes two of my favorite things: vaccines and patient education! I love vaccines so much that I spent three days of my vacation at the Clinical Vaccionology Conference last fall to learn more about vaccines. Once I get started talking about vaccines, why they are needed, and how they work, it’s hard for me to stop.

Why do I do get so passionate about vaccines? The main reason is because they prevent diseases and it’s probably the quickest and easiest way to improve your health. There are so many stories of people who have severe complications from diseases that could have been prevented – take polio, for example. Almost every adult over the age of 40 knows someone that was affected by polio but, now in 2016, it’s almost entirely eradicated in all but three countries in the world as a result of vaccinations to prevent the disease.

I also enjoy having conversations with patients regarding their fears and concerns about vaccines and giving them the information available to make educated decisions regarding their health. Throughout the month we’ll have different posts that focus on different vaccines and the concerns that surround them.

This week, our focus is on adult immunizations.

The need for vaccines does not end in childhood. All adults need vaccines based on their age, lifestyle, occupations, travel plans, and medical conditions. Adult vaccinations include Influenza, Tetanus/TDaP, Shingles, Pneumococcal, HPV, and Hepatitis A and B.

Each year thousands of adults are hospitalized or die from vaccine preventable diseases. According to the National Public Health Information Coalition an average of 226,000 people are hospitalized due to influenza and between 3,000 and 49,000 people die of influenza and its complications, the majority are among adults. 900,000 people get pneumococcal pneumonia every year, leading to as many as 400,000 hospitalizations and 19,000 deaths. In the U.S., HPV causes about 17,000 cancers in women, and about 9,000 cancers in men each year. About 4,000 women die each year from cervical cancer. All of these incidents could be prevented with proper vaccination.

It is not only important for adults to receive vaccines to protect themselves, but also to protect others in the community by preventing the spread of disease to those with weakened immune systems that may be more susceptible to the disease. If you aren’t sure if you are up-to-date on your vaccines, you should contact your healthcare provider today to help protect yourself and decrease the prevalence of these preventable diseases.

For additional information the CDC has great website on vaccines and the diseases they prevent. You can even take a quiz to find out what vaccines you might need. Feel free to leave your questions in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them! #VaxWithMe #NIAM16

August is National Immunization Month!

During National Immunization Awareness Month, the Family Care blog will be featuring several resources on vaccines and why it is important to stay up to date with all recommended vaccinations, for everyone from children to adults.

From the National Public Health Coalition:

National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) is an annual observance held in August to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. NIAM was established to encourage people of all ages to make sure they are up to date on the vaccines recommended for them. Communities have continued to use the month each year to raise awareness about the important role vaccines play in preventing serious, sometimes deadly, diseases. NIAM is sponsored by the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC). For more information on the observance, visit NPHIC’s NIAM website.

All adults should get vaccines to protect their health. Even healthy adults can become seriously ill, and can pass certain illnesses on to others. Everyone should have their vaccination needs assessed at their doctor’s office, pharmacy or other visits with healthcare providers. Certain vaccines are recommended based on a person’s age, occupation or health conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes or heart disease. Vaccination is important because it not only protects the person receiving the vaccine, but also helps prevent the spread of disease, especially to those that are most vulnerable to serious complications such as infants and young children, elderly, and those with chronic conditions and weakened immune systems.

All adults, including pregnant women, should get the influenza (flu) vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu. Every adult should have one dose of Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis or whooping cough) if they did not get Tdap as a teen, and then get the Td (tetanus and diphtheria) booster vaccine every 10 years. In addition, pregnant women are recommended to get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Adults 60 year and older are recommended to receive the shingles vaccine. And adults 65 and older are recommended to receive one or more pneumococcal vaccines. Some adults younger than 65 years with certain high risk conditions are also recommended to receive one or more pneumococcal vaccinations.

Adults may need other vaccines – such as hepatitis A, hepatitis B and HPV – depending on their age, occupation, travel, medical conditions, vaccinations they have already received or other considerations.

 

Insurance Terminology 101: “Approvals” and “Authorizations”

Insurance Terminology 101: “Approvals” and “Authorizations”

One commonly misunderstood concept about insurance coverage is the term “approval.” It seems pretty simple, but many people think that having a service approved by their insurance plan means that they will not have to pay for the service. While that is possible depending on the situation, the most often result is that the patient is left surprised and confused when they ultimately receive a bill for an “approved” service. This post is part of a series to help patients clarify the terminology that your insurance company is using so they can better understand their coverage.

Approval / Authorizations

Approval by an insurance plan means that they will allow you to get something done and will at least consider paying for the test. This does not mean that your health insurance will pay for the test – it means they agree that the procedure will be subjected to the benefits listed on your insurance plan. Authorizations are essentially the same thing as approvals, but you’ll hear authorizations more often with prescription coverage details. Just like approvals, a prescription authorization only means your insurance benefits will be applied to the claim for your prescription and does not guarantee payment.

While you may still be paying for an approved service, your insurance company at least acknowledges that this test or medication is generally recommended for your particular medical situation and should be considered as part of your plan’s benefits. They are not saying they won’t pay yet, but they also aren’t saying they will pay, either. This is the first chance in the claims process for your insurance company to get out of paying for a service, so getting this approval is a good first step.

However, obtaining an approval does not mean you will not still owe up to 100% of the service you are approved to receive. Your benefits for an approved service could include deductibles, coinsurances, copayments, and additional out-of-pocket expenses that you will have to pay the service’s provider. If you have a high deductible that has not been met, for example, you will still incur a large out-of-pocket expense for approved services.

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Let me know what you think in the comments section below. If there are any other phrases or terms that you sometimes get confused, please send me a message and I’ll try to feature your question on a feature post. Thanks for reading!

What can I do to help myself get better sleep?

What can I do to help myself get better sleep?

Keep in mind that you may need less sleep as you age. Some people need only 5 to 6 hours of sleep a night, but most people do better with 7 to 8 hours. Sleep usually occurs in 3-hour cycles, so it is important to get at least 3 uninterrupted hours of sleep.

These tips can help you develop better sleep habits:

  • Go to sleep only when you feel tired.
  • Avoid reading, watching TV or worrying in bed. These can cause your body and brain to associate your bed with these activities, rather than with sleep.
  • Develop a bedtime routine. Do the same thing every night before going to sleep. For example, take a warm bath and then read for 10 minutes every night before going to bed. Soon you’ll connect these activities with sleeping, and doing them will help make you sleepy.
  • Use the bedroom only for sleep and sexual activity.
  • If you can’t fall asleep after 15 minutes, go to another room and return to your bed only when you feel tired. You may repeat this as often as needed during the night.
  • Go to sleep and wake up at the same times each day, even on weekends. This helps your body develop a sleep schedule.
  • Avoid or limit napping, because it can disturb your normal sleep rhythm. If you must take a nap, only rest for 30 minutes and don’t nap after 3:00 p.m.
  • Avoid caffeine from coffee and soft drinks, and nicotine from cigarettes, especially late in the day.
  • Avoid eating large meals or drinking a lot of water in the evening.
  • Keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature and as dark as possible.
  • Make sure your bedroom is quiet and dark. If noise is a problem, use a fan to mask the noise or use ear plugs. If you must sleep during the day, hang dark blinds over the windows or wear an eye mask.
  • Try eating a light snack before going to bed, but don’t eat too much right before bedtime. A glass of warm milk or some cheese and crackers may be all you need.
  • Exercise regularly, but don’t exercise within a few hours before going to bed.
  • Set aside some time to relax before going to bed. For example, spend 30 minutes after dinner writing down what’s worrying you and what you can do about it.

Another good way to relax is to focus on your breathing by taking slow, deep breaths while counting to 5. Then listen to the sound of your breath as you breathe out. You can also try to tighten and relax the muscle groups in your body, beginning at your feet and ending with your face muscles. A trained therapist can teach you other ways to relax. Relaxation CDs or tapes may also help you relax.

Source

Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia by Parul Harsora, MD and Jennifer Kessmann, MD (American Family Physician January 15, 2009, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20090115/125.html)

Prolia Medication Guide

This page is a handy resource for patients at Family Care who have started taking Prolia. Please use the links below to access patient education materials that are required to be given to our patients before beginning treatment on Prolia. If you have any questions, please call our office and ask to speak with our nurse. Thank you!

Prolia Patient Brochure

Prolia Medication Guide

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to:

  • Treat osteoporosis (thinning and weakening of bone) in women after menopause (“change of life”) who:
    • are at high risk for fracture (broken bone)
    • cannot use another osteoporosis medicine or other osteoporosis medicines did not work well
  • Increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis who are at high risk for fracture
  • Treat bone loss in men who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body
  • Treat bone loss in women who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for breast cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body

World Family Doctor Day is May 19!

The first World Family Doctor Day was declared by the World Organization of Family Doctors (WONCA) in 2010. It has gained momentum globally each year, with activities, meetings, and celebrations planned to:

  • Bring attention to the contributions of family doctors globally;
  • Recognize family doctors;
  • Increase the morale of family doctors, and;
  • Highlight important issues relating to family doctors and the work they perform in supporting health care for people around the world.

From globalfamilydoctor.com:

  • World Family Doctor Day (FDD) – 19th May – was first declared by WONCA in 2010 and it has become a day to highlight the role and contribution of family doctors in health care systems around the world. The event has gained momentum globally each year and it is a wonderful opportunity to acknowledge the central role of our specialty in the delivery of personal, comprehensive and continuing health care for all of our patients. It’s also a chance to celebrate the progress being made in family medicine and the special contributions of family doctors all around the world.
  • We’re very happy for Member Organizations to develop their own theme for FDD, depending on local priorities, but this year we’d especially like to highlight smoking cessation. Smoking is the activity most damaging to health in a whole range of ways, and part of our role as family doctors is to be able to encourage our patients to stop smoking and to provide resources and support to help them.

To help raise awareness for this year’s special topic of smoking cessation, check out this beautiful infographic that describes the short-term and long-term benefits of quitting immediately!

Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive on Saturday, May 14

Tomorrow, May 14, is probably the easiest day all year to donate food to the hungry because the post office will literally come to your house and pick your donation up for you! Every year on the second Saturday in May, the USPS partners with several different food banks across the country to host the “Stamp Out Hunger” Food Drive. Just leave a box of non-perishable food items next to your mailbox tomorrow to help out a family in need!

Here is the full write up from the USPS:

Every second Saturday in May, letter carriers in more than 10,000 cities and towns across America collect the goodness and compassion of their postal customers, who participate in the NALC Stamp Out Hunger National Food Drive — the largest one-day food drive in the nation.

Led by letter carriers represented by the National Association of Letter Carriers (AFL-CIO), with help from rural letter carriers, other postal employees and other volunteers, the drive has delivered more than one billion pounds of food the past 24 years.

Carriers collect non-perishable food donations left by mailboxes and in post offices and deliver them to local community food banks, pantries and shelters. Nearly 1,500 NALC branches in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands are involved.

The United States Postal Service, National Association of Letter Carriers, National Rural Letter Carriers’ Association, AFL-CIO, United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW), United Way, Valassis and Valpak Direct Marketing Systems are all supporting this year’s Stamp Out Hunger food drive.

To donate, just place a box or can of non-perishable food next to your mailbox before your letter carrier delivers mail on the second Saturday in May. The carrier will do the rest. The food is sorted, and delivered to an area food bank or pantry, where it is available for needy families.

With 49 million people facing hunger every day in America, including nearly 16 million children, this drive is one way you can help those in your own city or town who need help.